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  • HiOA - Schools can implement simple measures to prevent obesity
    to live more healthily The challenge lies in reaching everyone We have managed to influence the level of physical activity particularly among girls Compared to boys girls achieved lower BMI levels increased their levels of physical activity and reduced their levels of sedentary activity says Grydeland All the same the biggest challenge lies in reaching everyone Obese children and adolescent boys who spend a lot of time in front of computers represented the most challenging groups to engage We also see that the measures that were implemented had less impact on those with lowest socioeconomic status that is children of parents with low levels of education than on others says Grydeland Comprehensive study The study involved the collection of data on around 1 500 children and the children s teachers were involved in implementing the measures School health services and parents were also engaged A total of 37 schools in the eastern part of southern Norway Østlandet took part in the intervention over two school years Twelve of the schools implemented specific measures during the school years between 2007 and 2009 The remaining 25 schools served as a control group This enabled researchers to follow the development of children for whom no measures had been implemented Grydeland explains No pressure to perform The researchers are pleased with the results of the main study By designing integrated intervention in the form of simple measure that were intended to influence the children they succeeded in making an impact on children s weight development levels of physical activity and inactivity and diet Grydeland is therefore convinced that schools are fully capable of influencing children s health behaviour by means of simple adaptations The measures can be associated with enjoyment and with pleasurable activities with no pressure to perform They could be about new

    Original URL path: http://www.hioa.no/eng/node_2273/Schools-can-implement-simple-measures-to-prevent-obesity (2015-09-15)
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  • HiOA - Social media is a challenge for the child welfare service
    want to keep in touch with each other they will always find a way of doing so via social media says Aamodt Today contact between children and their parents is regulated by law when a decision is made on who should take over care of the children When social media create possibilities for maintaining contact outside the scope of such decisions the basis for legally regulating the contact a child has with its parents is affected Creates pressure The study indicates that social media present parents with ways to constantly exert pressure on the child This can make the child so agitated that it affects its ability to settle in its new caregiving home and thereby prevents if from developing and forming attachments to new caregivers Other children may find that extended contact via social media makes it easier for them to adapt to their new home Prior to conducting the study it was not expected that this form of contact would be good for the child However the researchers have seen how extended contact has had a calming effect and has helped the child to deal with an otherwise difficult situation The children want help The children want help and support in managing the contact they have with their parents when they find that the pressure proves too much Svein Mossige Foto H Dyb NOVA Despite finding it sometimes difficult and intrusive the children prefer to have the possibility of maintaining contact via social media And since such contact cannot be regulated by law cooperation with the parents becomes a crucial factor in facilitating the best possible type of contact that also protects the child when necessary In general however the issue of social media also offers a basis for improving cooperation A relationship of cooperation or trust makes

    Original URL path: http://www.hioa.no/eng/node_2273/Social-media-is-a-challenge-for-the-child-welfare-service (2015-09-15)
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  • HiOA - PhD candidate profile: Anders Benteson Nygaard
    example does it matter how the systems are set and whether they are operated round the clock or only during the daytime The ventilation systems in most day care centres are quite similar but they re adapted to the individual buildings Why did you begin to research this topic My master s thesis dealt with characterising mould in indoor air and the development of respiratory problems such as asthma I studied lung cell cultures and how the immune response of cells reacted to exposure to mould In a way the grant is an extension of this though with more focus on the technical aspects of engineering and ventilation research problems What are you trying to find out We re trying to find weaknesses in design and operating protocols for ventilation systems My work mostly involves microbiology We look at how we can develop new methods of identifying potentially harmful bacteria and mould in indoor climates How do you go about finding answers We conduct on site inspections in day care centres check the systems and take technical measurements We examine condensation problems and air flow and take particle measurements in the ventilation systems Then we take a series of biological dust and air samples to identify microbes using molecular techniques These methods have undergone dramatic development over the past ten years and we can now obtain a lot more data than before We know there s a connection between damp and microorganisms and health complaints such as asthma but not much more than that We believe it has something to do with microorganisms more than damp What challenges does your field of research face Adapting techniques that are used a lot in other fields for example for identifying bacteria in diseases and environmental pollution to identify microorganisms in air and dust Other research interests I m very interested in research in general I read a lot of popular science literature I m interested in academic debates and I think it s fun to see how different fields of research think I think the Researcher Grand Prix is exciting and I like to see science being disseminated well Favourite scientific book Right now I m reading an interesting book calledThinking Fast and Slow I haven t got that far yet but it deals with psychology and human thought patterns Otherwise I recently readThe Power of Habit which deals with how people are controlled by habits and how much of everyday life runs on autopilot What do you read when you re not doing research I tend to read popular science books on the tram and subway to and from work I live in Oppsal and it often takes three quarters of an hour during the rush hour so I get quite a lot of time to read Apart from that I ve become a dad so I have less time for reading popular science now it s more a case of Winnie the Pooh and other children s books Where will

    Original URL path: http://www.hioa.no/eng/node_2273/PhD-candidate-profile-Anders-Benteson-Nygaard (2015-09-15)
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  • HiOA - "It gave me new insight"
    not planned to bring up such as when Dutch students talk about the queen and about much they appreciate her The students become aware of many small things which may be more deeply rooted than they realise Personal framework and Oslo framework The course covers topics such as religion culture human rights and early childhood conditions Hoaas defines two frameworks for discussing these issues The students must actively use their respective backgrounds and their gradually expanded knowledge of Oslo During their stay in Oslo they gain four weeks of practical experience in a school or day care centre something which presents them with many new challenges The Germans and the Dutch often have an impression of Scandinavia as a paradise of integration and adapted learning says Hoaas All the pupils are included here there are no special education schools whereas in their home countries they have a mix of special education schools and mainstream education In the Oslo schools they meet frustrated teachers who lack resources The situation is not that perfect after all with maybe four or five pupils in a class who have special needs But the Spanish find it incredible to see pupils with various learning difficulties in the same class They re also surprised that there can be one assistant for one pupil that would be inconceivable in their home country Norwegian schools also have smaller classes and facilitate closer pupil teacher contact than what many of them are used to Some of the international students are in favour of a performance based view of learning and find that Norwegian schools are lax They point out the lower rates of progression in for example mathematics and at subjects which they studied in fifth grade but which Norwegian pupils don t reach until seventh grade says Hoaas

    Original URL path: http://www.hioa.no/eng/node_2273/It-gave-me-new-insight (2015-09-15)
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  • HiOA - More specialisation may reduce dropout rates
    response to among other things reports published by researchers at the Department of Vocational Teacher Education at the Kjeller Campus where action research projects on interest differentiated training have been running since 2006 The pupils in the projects have had the same goals as those in the national curriculum though they differed according to which occupation the pupils wanted to specialise in The key researchers in the project are Professors Hilde Hiim and Grete Haaland and Assistant Professor Jorunn Dahlback FACILITATOR In an interest differentiated model the vocationaol teacher would become more of a facilitator for the jobs and tasks the pupils themselves find most interesting Several upper secondary schools in Norway have implemented the model successfully in the building and construcion training programmes Foto Benjamin A Ward New role for teachers I m now following this work up in my PhD more specifically as a project in which student teachers of vocational subjects use a special didactic approach based on teaching and working methods that are more specialised and interest differentiated Among other things I look at the degree of transfer from the educational institution to the practice field when we try to be a little bit out of step with mainstream practice says Spetalen As part of the work for his PhD the assistant professor is examining how vocational teacher education can contribute to developing a new role for teachers that is adapted to the structure of the vocational teacher education programmes in the upper secondary school and to determining how this role can be transferred to professional practice Greater choice creates more challenges Spetalen has for many years been involved in teaching and developing the bachelor programme for vocational teachers in restaurant and food processing Under the Curriculum for Knowledge Promotion in Primary and Secondary Education and Training pupils from this programme who proceed to corresponding training programmes in the upper secondary school can choose between twelve subject areas in Year 1 and between nine subject areas such as food processing in Year 2 This means that a class may contain pupils wanting to become bakers retail butchers cooks sausage makers and seafood retailers This situation poses considerable challenges for vocational teachers A teacher with a background as let s say a confectioner or a waiter cannot be expected to possess first hand knowledge of and skills in all these subjects The new role of the teacher must therefore be one of facilitator of pupils individual vocational interests and of someone who makes sure that pupils who are less sure about their interests and aspirations can try out different subjects and perhaps find one that sparks their enthusiasm The role of the teacher will also be to cover general topics and to demonstrate the impact and relevance these have regardless of which occupation pupils choose In restaurant and food processing for example production hygiene would be such a topic As educators of vocational teachers our role must therefore be to develop a didactics for tasks like these

    Original URL path: http://www.hioa.no/eng/node_2273/More-specialisation-may-reduce-dropout-rates (2015-09-15)
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  • HiOA - Norwegian-African cooperation
    boost Whereas before we always looked at the pupils first now we look at the teachers If we can manage to help the teachers the pupils will benefit We re talking about visions our mission traditions and culture We work together to release the stress and we use laughter therapy We try to get the parents to see what they can do for their children and all the members of the teaching staff celebrate small successes together I want to see teachers regain their enthusiasm for their work We work together and share useful experiences We want to bring positive thinking into school life says Jardien at the school where the Norwegian student teachers do their practical training Diversity in practice Psychologist Soraya Nair at Stellenbosch University in Cape Town supports the Norwegian students in thinking critically about their work on diversity while taking their practical training abroad In order to understand each other we must understand our own identity says Nair We must be able to identify how it feels to be different This is not just about skin colour everyone has experienced situations where they have felt different I ask the students to think about a time when they were the other and then everyone has a story to tell When we ask questions because we are interested and want to understand each other s stories then we can communicate says Nair Poverty in the villages Ingrid Lestrade is a director of the Goedgedacht Trust in South Africa and works with poor children living in the villages outside Cape Town where some of HiOA s students also have placements We want to invest in the children and to give them a reason to smile says Lestrade We get children coming to the day care centre who can t smile and who have no dreams They may have been used as a shield to protect mum from a drunken abusive dad They grow up with alcoholism and maybe get no more than a small bag of potato chips a day to eat We ve been operating for sixteen years now and the Norwegian students have the opportunity to be involved in a project that is changing We re fighting poverty by giving these children an education We want the children to develop self confidence complete their education and become leaders in their own communities says Lestrade The three South Africans presented their work at a seminar on Internationalisation of research and education at the Faculty of Education and International Studies The programme also contained experiences from Uganda where the vocational teacher education programme has been running a student exchange programme for ten years Experiences from Uganda Elisabeth Flaata Nina Brohjem Erik Johansson and Ellen Carm Foto Kari Aamli Exchange trip to Uganda Student vocational teacher in design and crafts Nina Brohjem was one of three white students among 20 000 African students at Kyambogo University in Kampala Uganda Everyone knew who we were and that in itself was reassuring

    Original URL path: http://www.hioa.no/eng/node_2273/Norwegian-African-cooperation (2015-09-15)
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  • HiOA - Call for papers: Beyond the Crisis in Europe
    deadline for submitting abstracts is 12 March 2014 Stream coordinators will rank all abstracts The organisers will inform successful applicants by 9 April 2014 Registration for the 12 ESPAnet conference starts 11 April 2014 The deadline for paper submission 4 August 2014 Streams coordinators in brackets Download the descriptions of the streams and contact details of stream coordinators 1 Diffusion of Ideas Sowa Zapfel 2 Towards a European Social Policy Kerschen Sweeney 3 Globalization and Social Policy Knijn León 4 On the Interrelationship of Environmental Social and Economic Sustainability Fitzpatrick Schaffrin 5 Comparative Methodology Reforms of Social Security Programs as Case Kuitto Scruggs 6 Welfare Funding 6a Occupational Welfare in Europe Pavolini Natali 6b The Welfare Funding Puzzle New Financial Approaches Marska Dzioba 7 Investigating Consequences of Family Policy Van Lancker Ugreninov 8 Gender Employment and the Crisis Kurz Ostner 9 Work and Welfare 9a Work and Welfare The Role of Employers van Berkel 9b Work Welfare and Disability Aurich Moreira 10 Migration and Social Policy Reconciling Diversity and Inclusive Social Welfare Eger Reeskens 11 Generations and Intergenerational Relations Herlofson Hellevik 12 Pension Reforms 12a After the Crisis A New Era of Pension Reforms Hinrichs 12b Evaluation Criteria for European Pension System Reforms Lagoutte Reimat 13 Health Care and Social Inequality Becker Stolberg 14 Marketization of Welfare and Care Frericks Pfau Effinger 15 Poverty Minimum Income Schemes and Active Inclusion Clegg Heidenreich 16 The Role of the Middle Classes in Historical Welfare State Development Hoogenboom May 17 Conceptualizing and Assessing Social Investment Morel Palme 18 Welfare State and Social Well Being Kurowska Michoń 19 Social Citizenship Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Studies Leibetseder Gubrium 20 Institutional Design and Reforms Consequences for Social Inequality Bothfeld Betzelt 21 Nordic Welfare Societies in the 21st Century Does it still make sense to talk about

    Original URL path: http://www.hioa.no/eng/node_2273/Call-for-papers-Beyond-the-Crisis-in-Europe (2015-09-15)
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  • HiOA - Children bear the brunt of cities' open-plan schools system
    learning environments for children and adolescents says Vinje Popular in the sixties In Norway open plan schools gained popularity in the late 1960s and lasted for around fifteen years Although those schools are still in use many municipalities decided to revert to classroom based school buildings due to conflicts with teacher organisations and parents committees However Oslo and to some extent Bergen chose to do the exact opposite According to Aftenposten s calculations in 2011 nineteen new school buildings in Oslo were based on designs that could be categorised as open plan And what is more a number of existing schools at primary lower and upper secondary level are currently being converted into open plan schools Research supports the classroom model Research on criteria for good learning argues strongly in favour of the classroom model and of teacher led organisation of instruction and student learning Vinje cites studies conducted by the respected New Zealand professor of education John Hattie among others In his own studies Vinje conducted surveys among teachers and studied media discourse on school buildings Eighty one per cent of the 1 700 teachers who responded to the survey favoured the traditional classroom environment When asked about their perception of being able to use qualitative methods to enhance learning teachers from the traditional schools showed far higher levels of satisfaction than their colleagues in open plan environments The media analysis which included both editorial coverage and media debates confirmed the impression that noise and disruption were often given as arguments by opponents of the open plan model In general the critics of open plan schools made more use of research findings to back up their arguments than their opponents says Vinje Influenced by the Swedish school system Erlend Vinje contends that the new wave of open plan schools though launched under more acceptable labels can be traced back to Norwegian enthusiasm for Sweden s open plan schools project Skola 2000 The vision for the project was to build a new category of school buildings combined with a new more project based system of school education Proponents of the project envisioned low building costs and savings on operational costs of up to twenty per cent compared with ordinary classroom based alternatives Many key Norwegian school managers and owners apparently visited these new schools and were evidently fascinated by the possibilities they offered for cheaper solutions Many school owners probably hope that the estimated twenty per cent savings on building and operating costs are realistic However the open plan solutions that were launched in Norway had no pedagogical plan to support them Teacher autonomy and the traditional method of class grouping were retained says Vinje However according to Vinje this method of grouping is not conducive to space planning that is based on large open spaces surrounded by small rooms Many teachers therefore compensate for what they perceive to be physically constrictive environments with the result that as many as twenty seven students can be squeezed into spaces that were

    Original URL path: http://www.hioa.no/eng/node_2273/Children-bear-the-brunt-of-cities-open-plan-schools-system (2015-09-15)
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