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  • Madagascar - norad.no
    for 1130 schools The building of 232 new classrooms in 2012 Starter pack with writing equipment and ruler for all schoolchildren Results from 2013 UNICEF WFP and ILO cooperated on 39 schools ILO built and equipped 50 new schools 1 3 million children were given school equipment 992 schools received equipment for the food programme More than 3000 teachers received pedagogical training A total of 9530 teachers received training through the programme 4200 schools had school based lesson plans A final review of the programme was made in May June 2014 including proposals for improvements and possibly extension Norway is the principal bilateral donor in the education sector and the most important when it comes to qualitative improvements and special efforts for children who have dropped out of the school system With a new regime there is hope that the the authorities will again give high priority to the social sectors including the education sector The Norwegian Mission Society s NMS partner the Malagasy Lutheran Church in Madagascar runs almost 300 schools Some Norwegian development assistance has gone to special schools to train teachers for blind and hard of hearing children and to integrating hard of hearing children into schools for those with normal hearing Support to the NMS through regional appropriations amounted to NOK 9 million in 2013 Environment and natural resource management Madagascar has a unique fauna and flora 80 per cent of species are found exclusively on the island The crisis of recent years has resulted in weakened governance and heavy pressure on nature Poverty also leads to overexploitation of tropical timber minerals and animals threatened with extinction Norwegian support to the environmental sector is channelled through the civil society and managed by both the Embassy Section in Antananarivo and Norad s Civil Society Department Alliance Voahary Gasy AVG is an environmental alliance for civil society that was established as a result of the increasing illegal logging following the coup d état in 2009 AVG provides a platform for around 30 environmental organizations throughout the island and is supported by Norway AVG has made a name for itself both as a watchdog against the severe abuse of the country s flora and fauna and as a communication and capacity building body The most important result is that the AVG is in a better position to carry out its own information work A green line has also been established for reporting violations of environmental legislation In 2013 1900 phone calls were received Worldwide Fund for Nature WWF employs Norwegian funding in three areas Establishing effective surveillance systems against deforestation Various initiatives in collaboration with the local population to reduce deforestation Reduction of illegal charcoal production through the introduction of more efficient production methods and alternative sources of energy A collaboration project with UNESCO financed through the Forest Fund for the Preservation of the Rainforest was recently launched in Madagascar Conservation International CI is also an important partner for REDD work on Madagascar Reducing Emissions from Deforestration and Forest

    Original URL path: http://www.norad.no/en/countries/africa/madagascar (2014-09-27)
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  • Malawi - norad.no
    the budget support review in November 2013 were good despite Cashgate Some of the results were Progress schedule and budget for the elections in 2014 were drawn up and approved Roll out of an accounting system for seven new institutions took place Contributions over the government budget for education and health were made as agreed 89 per cent of one year olds were vaccinated against measles 71 per cent of the population who require special medicines for HIV and AIDS received treatment 61 corruption cases were submitted to the courts after investigation 287 old police cases from the police Internal Affairs Section were wound up Climate Towards the end of 2013 the Embassy entered into an agreement with UN Women concerning subsidies for women engaged in agriculture The initial results of this support can be expected in 2014 Land shortages and climate change are making life difficult for smallholders To compensate for this 1 5 million smallholders received subsidies in the form of fertiliser and certified seed maize in 2013 The subsidy programme has assured Malawi of surplus maize production since its introduction in 2005 but is controversial because the programme consumes 70 per cent of the Ministry of Agriculture s total budget Climate smart agriculture Norwegian support has contributed to an increase in the income generated by various crops since 2012 Almost 10 000 new households switched to conservation agriculture in 2013 Most of the farmers who engage in climate smart agriculture have experienced higher yields even during the drought Planting of forests 7 6 million trees have been planted 590 new microcredit groups have been established 73 per cent women 847 new study circles and 780 new production clubs The Embassy is the most important support for the smallholders organization NASFAM whose membership rose from 51 000 to 74 000 in the course of 2013 46 per cent women The Embassy took the initiative for the establishment of a network of agricultural partners to make it easier for the organizations to learn from one another and contribute to a breakthrough for climate smart agriculture in the country Food security In the wake of the greatest humanitarian crisis since 2005 the Embassy teamed up with Ireland and Flanders at year end 2012 2013 to finance purchases of 36 per cent of the maize needed in the humanitarian operation Norway financed 80 per cent of this and this was crucial for enabling the humanitarian operation in 2013 to proceed according to plan With the aid of Norwegian support for climate change adaptation and food security 18 813 households switched to energy efficient coke ovens resulting in less work tree felling and smoke induced disease Women and gender equality The Norwegian Embassy in Lilongwe is a pilot embassy on women and gender equality and is the largest contributor to this sphere in Malawi The Gender Coordination Network has been receiving support from the Embassy since 2007 which has helped to improve coordination and cooperation among voluntary organizations that work for gender equality In the struggle against gender based violence the Malawi Human Rights Resource Cent re MHRRC has also received funding since 2007 to coordinate a network in this area This has resulted in an increase in the number of women who stand up for their rights and report cases of violence In 2012 22 880 cases of gender based violence were reported The police observed an increase in the number of cases reported in 2013 which is attributable to awareness raising initiatives and attitude changing campaigns The Embassy gave Norwegian Church Aid in Malawi funding to combat people smuggling and trafficking In 2013 116 boys and 11 girls aged between six and sixteen were rescued through the programme The Embassy supported the Centre for Legal Assistance CELA in the work of improving conditions in Malawian prisons and arranging for easier access to the legal system for women young people and vulnerable men One of the biggest human rights problems in the country today is that persons are remanded for several years without trial and that conditions in prisons are appalling because they are overfilled Inmates received legal assistance through the CELA project to bring their cases quickly to trial Some of the results were Support for better legal protection for inmates led to 1265 remand prisoners 45 women and 110 youngsters having their cases tried before courts in the jails in 2013 Of these 418 were released 37 were women and 119 youngsters against payment of a fine or community service Support for schooling in prisons led to 234 young inmates receiving teaching in 2013 In the third term 140 of 166 pupils passed their exams Interventions were funded in 16 different prisons Support was also given to interventions at 18 police stations and four youth prisons A total of 4165 persons received help in the period 2012 2013 The Embassy supported the Malawi Human Rights Resource Centre MHRRC in coordinating and making a national response to gender based violence The MHRRC focuses on work with special victim support units VSUs at police stations in 18 districts and attitude changing campaigns and awareness raising projects at local level In 2013 two VSUs were built one is ready for use while the other is ready for inspection Over 4200 women who have been subjected to violence have received help and support from psychologists through the MHRRC Democracy and human rights Norway supported preparations for the elections in May 2014 As a result of many years of cooperation between the authorities the UN and the Embassy Malawi was the African country in 2013 in which the largest proportion of the population 79 per cent according to Afrobarometer feel that they can speak their minds freely As a result of Norway s support for various programmes some 140 000 persons received instruction in human rights and democracy in 2013 Acting through local rights groups they hold the authorities accountable and monitor spending of public resources A total of about 850 000 persons have

    Original URL path: http://www.norad.no/en/countries/africa/malawi (2014-09-27)
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  • Mali - norad.no
    assembly in December 2011 The Act states among other things that women must obey their husbands it sets the age limit for marriage at 18 years for men and 16 years for women The country has had ambitions to become self sufficient in food but food production has not managed to keep pace with population growth Food production increased by 30 per cent during the period from 2009 to 2011 and grain crops in Mali were record high in the 2009 10 season due to relatively good rainfall combined with investments in the agriculture sector In autumn 2011 however the rains failed The Malian government has described the situation in North Mali as catastrophic There is a complete lack of basic services infrastructure and equipment has been pillaged or destroyed Mali is one of the world s poorest countries and it was greatly impacted by the crises first in Côte d Ivoire and then in Libya Many families lost a great deal of income from family abroad who sent money home Terrorist activities in North Mali had already resulted in a drastic reduction in tourism one of Mali s most important sources of income Norway s development cooperation In line with most other donors Norway has gradually resumed development cooperation with Mali in 2013 An expanded Norwegian engagement is under development The Norwegian authorities are planning to concentrate development cooperation with Mali around climate robust food security peace stability and reconciliation as well as the reinforcement of democratic institutions The absence of a functioning central and local administration has given civil societal actors supported by Norwegian voluntary organisations an important role in more long term aid especially in education health local democracy and work in strengthening human rights including the rights of women Norway also contributes military personnel to the UN operation MINUSMA In 2012 Norway gave a total of approximately NOK 95 million to Mali this increased to NOK 152 million in 2013 Norwegian actors have been involved in Mali for nearly 30 years The drought disaster in Sahel in the 1980s was the starting point for the extensive Sahel programme which built up the competence on which Norwegian involvement is still based Cooperation has gone through various actors public Malian institutions multilateral organisations Norwegian voluntary organisations and research institutions An agreement for bilateral cooperation between Norway and Mali for the period from 2011 to 2013 was signed on 10 February 2011 before the rebellion spread Norwegian voluntary organisations and the United Nations Development Programme UNDP have been the most important cooperation partners in addition to the Malian authorities Norway and Mali have good bilateral relations despite being limited in the areas of foreign policy and economic cooperation The basis for these good relations are in Norwegian humanitarian involvement research cooperation and development cooperation which has been going on since the 1980s for instance through Norwegian universities and voluntary organisations such as Norwegian Church Aid CARE and the Strømme Foundation Before the coup d état in 2012 the following

    Original URL path: http://www.norad.no/en/countries/africa/mali (2014-09-27)
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  • Mozambique - norad.no
    in Cabo Delgado province will mean thousands of jobs but without relevant skills the local population will derive little benefit from this The Norwegian Embassy has taken part in discussions with the authorities and the business sector on how local human resources can be promoted with particular emphasis on strengthening the quality and relevance of vocational trainings In 2013 an agreement was signed with the Ministry of Education for support via the Technical and Vocational Education and Training Project PIREP The objective of the project is to establish a model in which the private sector contributes both funding and expertise and actively takes part in developing curricula in training and in providing apprentice positions Read more about the cooperation between Norway and Mozambique through the Oil for development programme Climate Mozambique is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world to climate change This vulnerability relates mainly to changes in temperature and precipitation patterns increase in extreme weather sea level rise and erosion along coastal regions This increases the risk of poorer crop yields and a reduction in arable land In some regions a reduction in agricultural production of up to 25 per cent is expected Drought and floods must be expected to cause a rise in water borne diseases irregular production and distribution of hydroelectric power and erosion and destruction of roads and infrastructure More extreme weather will also have major consequences for densely populated areas along the coast The Norwegian collaboration with the voluntary organization CLUSA with the focus on climate smart agriculture continued in 2013 The project has had a slow start but greater activity is expected in 2014 In 2013 the Norwegian Embassy also entered into a multi year agreement with Norwegian People s Aid to provide support for two national farmers organizations UNAC and ORAM They too are working for more climate smart agriculture The implementation of activities in Reaching the Poor Program RPP approved by the World Bank in 2012 to take the necessary preliminary steps in the international work to reduce discharges from deforestation and forest degradation REDD has been severely delayed and little happened in 2013 Mozambique has begun in cooperation with the African Development Bank to prepare a strategy for implementing a green economy The objective is that the underlying principles should be established as governing premisses for Mozambique s new five year development plan from 2014 onwards Fisheries Fisheries account for around three per cent of the country s gross domestic product Illegal unregistered and under reported fishing is estimated to result in around USD 64 million in lost income Both national and foreign vessels are involved Stepping up of surveillance capacity is a highly prioritized task The important prawn fishing industry is threatened by overexploitation disease and environmental changes The government s long term plan for the fisheries sector involves increased investment in fish farming which appears to have by far the greatest potential for higher production To achieve this it will be important to produce high quality fry increase feed production and improve the logistics and provide access to credit Norway contributes NOK 150 million to the fisheries sector in the course of a five year period A new fisheries programme for the period 2013 2017 was drawn up and an agreement signed and implemented in 2013 Central to the new programme are surveillance and control of Mozambican waters the development of fish farming and building the capacity of the Ministry of Fisheries and underlying agencies Good governance and human rights In recent years Mozambique has achieved a number of quality improvements in its public financial management The conducting of the Sistafe reform programme played a key part in this respect Improvements have been made in connection with revenue management external aid payment operations disbursement of salaries procurement and external audit Mozambique also shows marked improvements in transparency and disclosure in its public financial management Mozambique scores relatively high on the World Bank s Voice and Accountability indicators compared with neighbouring countries and other African countries Mozambique has civil society actors who are willing to stand up and criticize the governance of the country and a growing critical mass of social actors who contribute to expanding democracy The watchdog institution Centre for Public Integrity CIP which receives support from Norway has played an important part in exercising surveillance investigating and exposing corruption cases The CIP has also played an important part in creating more openness and public debate about the management of Mozambique s revenues from natural resources An important milestone for Mozambique with respect to transparency concerning revenues from non renewable natural resources was the EITI Board s decision in October 2012 that Mozambique is now compliant with EITI standards EITI stands for Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and works for transparency surrounding cash flows from petroleum and mining activities Mozambique s fourth EITI report was completed in March 2014 and covers the year 2011 The report reveals a discrepancy of 0 4 per cent between what companies claim to have paid to the authorities and what the authorities claim to have received in revenues from the companies This discrepancy is regarded as relatively small and compliant with the EITI standard The number of companies included in the report is 39 Of these 23 are involved in mining including coal and 16 in hydrocarbons A total of USD 100 million was claimed from these companies which is a 59 per cent increase on 2010 Norway has supported the Mozambican Human Rights League for a number of years The organization plays an important part in exercising surveillance investigating and taking up violations of human rights It works to improve imprisonment and prison conditions land rights associated with the mining industry and commercial agriculture and UN principles for the business sector and human rights It also represents individuals in the legal system There is a relatively high proportion of women in national politics with 39 per cent women in parliament This is partly due to the governing

    Original URL path: http://www.norad.no/en/countries/africa/mozambique (2014-09-27)
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  • Nigeria - norad.no
    an ambitious reform of the power sector has been implemented and the Election Commission and the Human Rights Commission have been strengthened The results of efforts to combat corruption oil theft and the sabotage of oil pipelines have however been modest Norway s aid to Nigeria Norway does not have any aid agreements with the authorities in Nigeria However it gives aid to work with maternal and child health democracy human rights and good governance It does not appear that Nigeria will achieve the UN millennium development goals particularly with regard to health Vaccine coverage in northern Nigeria is very low and polio is still endemic Maternal mortality in northern Nigeria is among the highest in the world Norway therefore decided in 2012 to continue its cooperation with Nigeria with regard to health and entered into an agreement for NOK 30 million over a five year period This is part of the campaign Saving one million lives which was launched by the country s president Increased access to life saving medicines with a focus on the health of women and children are the main elements of the initiative Read more about health cooperation here This cooperation is showing positive results Preliminary results show that the number of births with qualified assistance has doubled and that infant mortality has been reduced by half since the start of the programme In spite of the major challenges that areas in northern Nigeria face the initiatives have been well implemented Innovation helps save lives but what is decisive is that innovations are actually available to poor people in rural areas Together with Nigeria Norway has therefore led a commission that aims to improve access to 13 vital but neglected health products that are used for maternal and child health Read more about the medicines that should save lives here Democracy human rights and good governance Norway supports the voluntary organisation African Network for Environment and Economic Justice ANEEJ which works in states in the Niger Delta region The goal is to strengthen budgeting and financial management by the authorities and create greater transparency in relation to the population The results are better and more structured information from the states to the population and the holding of public meetings Norway also supports the United Nations Development Programme s UNDP s work to improve governance of the states in the Niger Delta region and for the development of a national peace architecture The programme has contributed to the adoption of legislation for government procurement and the establishment of a procurement office and control entities The programme has also contributed to the independent national Human Rights Commission being able to recruit and train human rights monitors that are to be deployed in the three states that are particularly hard hit by the conflict with Boko Haram The Norwegian Embassy in Nigeria has zero tolerance for corruption and has strengthened the procedures for its own operations The two most important aid initiatives the support through the UNDP and

    Original URL path: http://www.norad.no/en/countries/africa/nigeria (2014-09-27)
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  • Somalia - norad.no
    that the UN uses and it means that at least two people per 10 000 are dying of hunger each day and that at least 30 per cent of children under five are undernourished UN statistics for 2013 show that more than 1 1 million Somalians are still internally displaced Due to drought the situation in large parts of the country is generally precarious This leads to a shortage of food and water especially in the conflict torn southern and central parts of the country Norwegian aid to Somalia Norwegian development aid to Somalia increased substantially in 2013 and Norwegian aid effectiveness calls for flexibility willingness to take risks and an understanding of the political power battle in Somalia However development work is difficult and the country is still marked by war and conflict Norwegian Church Aid and the Norwegian Refugee Council are among the Norwegian actors who have worked in Somalia for many years and in addition to these organizations UNDP and Somalian authorities are among Norway s main partners Somalia is reviewing its provisional constitution and preparing for elections in 2016 difficult processes that require close cooperation between international partners and Somalian authorities Important goals for Norwegian engagement on development aid in the country are peace stability and the growth of democracy The tools to achieve this are support for the forces of moderation contribution to legitimate political processes and the development of public services Norwegian priorities in Somalia Reconstruction Good governance Capacity building Prevention of humanitarian disasters Peace and reconciliation Given the weak capacity on the Somalian side Somalian institutions need to be brought up to a minimum level Norway prioritizes support to peacebuilding trust building activity and the establishment of core state functions through contributions to the UN and non state actors Such support includes The Somalia Stability Fund a multinational fund that gives priority to building the capacity of political institutions at central and regional level UNDP receives support for its work with access to justice the police and environmental management with the objective of increasing services provided by public authorities in all regions UNDP ILO UNEP UNICEF and UN Habitat receive support for improvement of local governance and public services at district level with the goal of increasing the quality and quantity of public services The Somali Compact was established in 2013 as a framework for how Somalia and the donor countries should work together for development over the next three years An entirely new aid architecture is being established against the backdrop of the OECD New Deal principles for vulnerable states In 2013 the federal government in Mogadishu members of parliament and civil society with the UN and the EU as main donors set up a high level partnership forum to oversee the implementation of the Somali Compact with peace and reconciliation as priority areas The Norwegian Embassy participates in some of the working groups and chairs the group working on national revenue Long term development assistance During 2013 the Norwegian Embassy s

    Original URL path: http://www.norad.no/en/countries/africa/somalia (2014-09-27)
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  • South Africa - norad.no
    was in held in February 2013 which representatives of the Norwegian Supreme Court also attended Increasing political pressure on courts is a challenge The project has shown that sharing of experience among judges generates a positive effect The CHR cooperates extensively with legal communities in Africa and contributes to an essential boosting of the expertise of judges and jurists The CHR is an example of an apolitical African institution that contributes through its work to building knowledge and credibility Some of the support in 2013 funded a series of courses for judges and jurists The effect of the courses is reflected in the fact that judges have applied their new knowledge to a number of cases and thereby contributed to raising legal quality In 2012 Norway signed a new agreement with the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation IJR The IJR is active as a bridge builder and advisor in reconciliation processes in areas of conflict In 2013 the IJR was involved in reconciliation processes in Kenya Tunisia Zimbabwe and Burundi among others The Institute is also engaged at national and local level in South Africa with the focus on social and economic inclusion and democratic development Climate and environment An agreement between the research authorities in South Africa and Norway was signed in 2013 So far the Research Council of Norway has been the driving force in the cooperation A tender competition has been held and resulted in the funding of some 20 projects in the field of climate change adaptation and clean energy One of the primary activities in the climate related work is support for the South African Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage SACCCS The dialogue with Norwegian political and specialist circles has been strengthened Contact with the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate in particular has been valuable In addition to operating funds for the centre substantial funding for the collaboration has been granted through the World Bank and directly by the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy Support for the African network of environmental protection ministers the African Group of Negotiators AGN has ended The AGN is a grouping whose efforts are directed at building up expertise and the harmonization of African views in connection with the Climate Convention UNFCCC The AGN has expressed satisfaction with the results In 2013 the Norwegian Embassy entered into two three year agreements with Norwegian Church Aid with the aim of strengthening the position of civilians and their possibility of safeguarding their own interests in areas where the local population is particularly affected by incursions into nature and by mining operations The focus is on resource management and climate and activities are focused on countries in southern Africa Norwegian Church Aid was chosen as a partner in light of the organization s experience of working through grassroots and faith based organizations in the region It is too early to draw any conclusions about the results of their activities Peace and security An agreement with the Institute for Security Studies ISS is continuing

    Original URL path: http://www.norad.no/en/countries/africa/south-africa (2014-09-27)
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  • South Sudan - norad.no
    to achieve independence In a country that is twice the size of Norway weak and inadequate infrastructure still represents a major challenge despite the opening of thousands of kilometres of gravel roads between the cities and to neighbouring countries since 2005 There has been strong economic development particularly in the larger cities and new industries have been established with transport construction and utilities commerce and the service industry as drivers of development The capital Juba was considered to be the world s fifth fastest growing city in 2013 Two million landmines have been removed and roads and rural areas opened up After almost 40 years of civil war all state structures institutions and procedures had to be built from scratch The employees in the new ministries courts commissions and local administration around the country often had little education Many of them were former guerilla soldiers Taking this into consideration South Sudan has come a long way in establishing a state apparatus but by the same token the authorities capacity to govern and deliver results is still among the weakest on the globe There has also been some progress with regard to social development but South Sudan is still in a very poor position when it comes to key development indicators More than 70 per cent of the population over 15 years old are illiterate Maternal mortality is among the highest in the world at 2 054 deaths per 100 000 births The same applies to infant death which is at 102 deaths per 1 000 newborns A total of 83 per cent of the population live in villages Most people make a livelihood from subsistence agriculture or cattle farming Almost 40 per cent of households have to walk at least half an hour to fetch water One per cent of the population have a bank account while 15 per cent have a telephone Human rights Serious and extensive human rights violations have been committed since the armed conflict broke out in Juba and spread to the three north eastern states This is well documented in a UN report published on 9 May 2014 Ethnic killings and attacks have been widespread on both sides of the conflict and people have been killed in churches and hospitals The African Union AU has also set up its own commission of inquiry and will present a report in autumn 2014 South Sudanese authorities have expressed their willingness to cooperate with this commission and to follow the recommendations arising from it Further reading FN krever at overgripere straffes UN demands that perpetrators are punished After ten years of war the large quantity of weapons and easy access to these was and is a particular challenge Militia whose roots go back to the civil war and other armed groups operate in the conflict regions uncontrolled by either the government army the SPLA or the opposition s military leadership This further exacerbates the lack of security for the population in these regions Further reading 40 years in war torn Sudan Arbitrary detentions are a significant problem and the rule of law for human rights activists has deteriorated following the start of the conflict Freedom of the press is also under pressure South Sudan fell to 124th place on the Reporters Without Borders list in 2012 The government has given its agreement to a number of key human rights conventions but it is clear that its ability to implement these conventions is limited and the authorities recognize that there is a significant need for capacity building in the area of human rights The work to put in place legislation on the press and information has been ongoing for several years and a number of important draft bills are now undergoing parliamentary review The position of women in South Sudan is generally weak and further weakened as a result of the conflict Women largely lack basic skills in reading and writing According to crime statistics violence against women is worryingly high Women and equality are integrated in most of the programmes that Norway supports and furthermore Norwegian People s Aid Norwegian Church Aid the Norwegian Refugee Council and the Strømme Foundation work actively with gender equality issues in South Sudan Child soldiers were a widespread problem during the civil war In summer 2014 the UN has documented that this is once again widespread although both parties claim that this is not the case The road ahead Democracy in South Sudan is young and its institutions are fragile The Sudan People s Liberation Movement SPLM is still by far the largest party in the country and dominates both the government and parliament but is powerless after the conflict Further reading Utvikling satt på vent i Sør Sudan Development put on hold in South Sudan A solution to the political crisis which South Sudan is currently experiencing is contingent upon all factions in the governing party coming to an agreement on the reform of the SPLM The agreement signed in Addis Ababa on 10 June 2014 calls for the formation of a unity government and the implementation of a broad national dialogue and reconciliation process In addition the current transitional constitution must be replaced by a permanent constitution through a democratic process Norwegian development cooperation In the light of the severe crisis in South Sudan Norway has refocused its development cooperation on the major humanitarian needs that have arisen This modification is taking place in dialogue and cooperation with other key donors who are working on a similar modification of their programmes The donors have agreed on joint principles for cooperation priorities and approaches to their work in South Sudan While short term humanitarian efforts are emphasized there is a clear understanding that a more long term approach is needed even in the current situation Priority is given to interventions that support the political process under the auspices of IGAD AU and contribute to stabilization prevention human rights democracy and reconciliation Erosion of the structure of government and cessation of key

    Original URL path: http://www.norad.no/en/countries/africa/south-sudan (2014-09-27)
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